William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Mean Girls – Ian Doescher

42060068.jpgMean Girls, in the style of Shakespeare. What’s not to love?

“On Wednesdays, we array ourselves in pink!”

I’ll admit I’m not actually familiar with Shakespeare. I know his work, I’ve seen some of the film-adaptations, but I’ve never actually read one of his plays. However, I am vaguely familiar with the general Shakespearean style, and I know Mean Girls almost word-for-word. This meant I found this book really easy to read, and I would definitely recommend it to other readers who might know the film better than they know the bard.

This book is hilarious. It is the movie, in it’s entirety, re-written into a Shakespearean play, complete with stage directions and iambic pentameter. I really, really enjoyed seeing how the most iconic lines were going to appear: “Say, is thy muffin butter’d well? Shall I find a helpful volunteer, Who would most gladly butter up thy muffin?” 

It’s really well done, with references to original Shakespeare scattered throughout, while staying completely true to the movie. The illustrations and pretty pages separating each act were a nice touch. Such a fun read – 10/10.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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To Kill a Kingdom – Alexandra Christo

37541225.jpgPrincess Lira is siren royalty, feared and revered throughout the ocean but living in the terrifying shadow of her mother, the Sea Queen. Prince Elain is heir to the golden throne of Midas, dedicating himself to hunting down the elusive Prince’s Bane – a siren known for stealing the hearts of princes all over the world. The pair’s paths cross when the Sea Queen curses Lira with humanity, banishing her from life in the sea until she returns with the heart of the great siren hunter.

To Kill a Kingdom is inspired by The Little Mermaid, which I didn’t realise until I started reading and picked up on all the similarities. The story is very different, but some aspects are clearly taken from The Little Mermaid (Lira’s red hair, the Sea Queen’s tentacles, Lira being turned human and losing her ‘song’, etc). This was actually a really exciting feature for me because, although fairy-tale inspired books are common, The Little Mermaid is quite a rare one.

The book is generally well-written, but I did struggle to picture one or two aspects. I found it really difficult to visualise the difference between sirens, mermaids and mermen, but I’m not too sure why. I’m not going to blame the author’s descriptions, because it could simply be that the image of mer-people is one so ingrained in my brain that I can’t visualise an alternative. However, this didn’t hinder my overall enjoyment of the story.

There are a lot of great characters. Lira and Elain are both decent enough protagonists, but the side characters really stole the show. Elain crew, especially Madrid and Kye, are fantastic and entertaining while even much smaller characters like Khalia play important roles within the plot.

It’s not perfect, but the excessive sassy banter that fills this book really makes up for it’s flaws. The flaws are minor and difficult to pick out; there’s just something about this book that stops it being a work of genius, but it’s a good read.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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Weight – Jeanette Winterson

40118697.jpgWeight is a re-telling of the story of Atlas and Heracles. Heracles, when trying to complete his trials, seeks help from Atlas who carries the world on his shoulders. During his temporary relief from the weight of the world, Atlas begins to question, does it even need to be carried?

I was not already familiar with the story of Atlas and Heracles so I didn’t have expectations of this retelling. I love mythology (Greek gods in particular) so was keen to read something new.

Overall, I really enjoyed it. It’s very short (150 pages), and a very fast read. Winterson’s writing style is clear and engaging, and the story felt fresh.

The only thing I wasn’t keen on was the, frankly, vulgar sexual references. The abrupt mentions of rape and masturbation were unexpected and pretty grim. I’m not used to rape being referred to so casually. However, this is a story about Greek gods, who typically did pillage and rape whomever they wished, so – in fairness to the author – it’s entirely in place here.

Weight is part of a collection from Canongate, called The Canons. After reading this one, I am already looking into reading some of the other myth re-tellings by other authors in the collection.

I received a copy of this book from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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The Beast’s Heart – Leife Shallcross

36273241In this retelling of Beauty and the Beast, the focus is on the Beast’s side of the story. A lonely beast, cursed and isolated, has a chance encounter with a lost traveller. In return for saving the man’s life, the Beast gains the company of his daughter, Isabeau, for a year, during which he finds both love and his humanity.

For the first half of this book, I felt a bit cheated. It wasn’t so much a retelling, but rather an almost identical version of the Beauty and the Beast story we’re all familiar with, from the point of view of the beast. To me, this felt like a bit of a cop-out and was a little disappointing. Fortunately, the second half of the book and the details of Isabeau’s sisters did take the story in a new direction.

The magical elements are enchanting. The book is very descriptive and beautifully written with a flowing plot and complex characters. Plus, how stunning is that cover, right?

It’s a classic story, and very well-written, if a little unoriginal. I enjoyed it a lot.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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